#18 – Movies in the Golden Age

Writer's History #1 – Max Hawthorne Interview A Reader's History of Science Fiction

For my first interview on the show, I spoke to Max Hawthorne, author of the paleo-fiction thriller, Kronos Rising, about his writing and his experiences with science fiction as a whole. Max's website. Max's peer-reviewed scientific paper on Plesiosaurs. Max's book recommendations: The Bug Wars by Robert Asprin Hiero's Journey by Sterling Lanier
  1. Writer's History #1 – Max Hawthorne Interview
  2. #20 – Philip K. Dick
  3. #19 – The New Wave
  4. #18 – Movies in the Golden Age
  5. #17 – Arthur C. Clarke

Like books, movies and television also went through a golden age in science fiction in the 1950s. In this episode we explore the trends in the visual medium at the time and how they compared to print.

Movie recommendation: The Day the Earth Stood Still.

Rotten Tomatoes’s list of top sci-fi films.

Check out this episode!

About Alex R. Howe

I'm a full-time astrophysicist and a part-time science fiction writer.
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2 Responses to #18 – Movies in the Golden Age

  1. Terry Somerville says:

    “movies and television also went through a golden age”
    Yes, but this is a reader’s history!

  2. Tom Bridgman says:

    Interesting aspects on the original Day the Earth Stood Still that I had not thought of.

    In regards to 2001, I think it was in “Lost Worlds of 2001” that Clarke said the effects version of Saturn was so incredibly realistic that they were concerned the audience wouldn’t believe it, so they sent Discovery to Jupiter instead.
    The effects people for “2001” (Douglas Trumbull?) would later use the Saturn they developed in “Silent Running”. Wikipedia page just reports the “2001” set had ‘technical difficulties’ with Saturn, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_Running

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