Category Archives: A Reader's History of Science Fiction

Writer’s History #3 – Dr. Benjamin Stevens Interview

Dr. Benjamin Stevens is a professor of classical studies who researches the relationship between the ancient/classical tradition and science fiction and fantasy. In this wide-ranging interview, we discuss what makes sci-fi distinctive, classicism and modernity, ancient aliens, and more. Dr. … Continue reading

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#28 – Children’s Sci-Fi in the New Wave

Children’s science fiction was still an unusual and peripheral category during the New Wave, but it did produce some important new classics. In this episode, we explore the highlights of what kids were reading during this time. Book recommendations:For upper … Continue reading

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#27 – Feminist Science Fiction

Among the various social changes that accompanied the New Wave, this time period saw the rise of second-wave feminism. In this episode, we explore how that movement influenced the genre of science fiction. Book recommendation: The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le … Continue reading

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Writer’s History #2 – Kira Leigh Interview

In this episode, I interview Kira Leigh, author of the new, anime-inspired space epic, Constelis Voss, Volume 1. Kira’s website. Kira’s TV recommendations: Farscape Earth 2 Check out this episode!

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#26 – Vonnegut, Adams, and Modern Satire

While many early works of proto-sci-fi were satires like Gulliver’s Travels, satirical works also appear in modern sci-fi. In this episode, we take a look at the two most famous authors of this subgenre, Kurt Vonnegut and Douglas Adams. Book recommendation: Slaughterhouse-Five … Continue reading

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#25 – Strange New Worlds

While much of the New Wave was about exploring inner space, some authors were still writing about exploring other words. In this episode, we see how this subgenre of “strange new worlds sci-fi” developed, both through Star Trek and through the … Continue reading

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#24 – The New Dystopias

In the New Wave, a new batch of dystopian stories appeared that reflected the newer concerns of the time. These were different from the classics like Nineteen Eighty-Four–more diverse, and very often more hopeful. In this episode, we explore the highlights … Continue reading

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#23 – Overpopulation and Environmental Collapse

In the 60s and 70s, awareness of environmental issues was rising, and that was reflected in the New Wave of science fiction. Of particular note were overpopulation and pollution (leading to widespread environmental collapse). In this episode, we explore the … Continue reading

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#22 – Nuclear War

The Cold War brought with it new tales of nuclear war in science fiction, both in the early days of the 50s and 60s, and later, when fears began to rise again. In this episode, we look at the highlights … Continue reading

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#21 – Apocalypse How?

In the 1950s and 60s, disaster and apocalyptic stories became prominent. However, the earliest ones could get pretty weird. It this episode, we take a look at the fantastic apocalypses that gave way to more realistic ones later on. Book … Continue reading

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