Category Archives: Science Fiction

#17 – Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke was the fourth of the “Big Four” authors of the golden age of science fiction. In this episode, we explore his work and his unique writing style, especially centered around “sufficiently advanced technology.” Book recommendation: The City … Continue reading

Posted in A Reader's History of Science Fiction, Science Fiction | Comments Off on #17 – Arthur C. Clarke

#16 – Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury is most famous as the author of Fahrenheit 451, but he was an important and unique figure in science fiction at-large, a master of short fiction with a colorful, Hollywood-centered career. Here, we explore some of his most … Continue reading

Posted in A Reader's History of Science Fiction, Science Fiction | Comments Off on #16 – Ray Bradbury

#15 – Robert Heinlein Part II: Politics, Religion, and Sex

Robert Heinlein’s later career went to some unusual places, including books with heavy philosophical and political themes, while still continuing with his classic hard sci-fi rigor. In this episode, we explore the highlights of his later work. Book recommendation: The … Continue reading

Posted in A Reader's History of Science Fiction, Science Fiction | Comments Off on #15 – Robert Heinlein Part II: Politics, Religion, and Sex

#14 – Robert Heinlein Part I: The Juveniles

Robert Heinlein was one of the first major authors to write science fiction specifically for children. In this episode, we explore how he did it and what sets him apart from his contemporaries in this area, along with the other … Continue reading

Posted in A Reader's History of Science Fiction, Science Fiction | 1 Comment

20020: the Sequel to 17776

Three years ago, I reviewed a web serial/visual novel called 17776: What Football Will Look Like in the Future created by Jon Bois of the SB Nation blog, an absurdist tale about a far future where humans are immortal, and … Continue reading

Posted in Science Fiction, Uncategorized, Web Review | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on 20020: the Sequel to 17776

#13 – Isaac Asimov Part II: Robots

We continue our exploration of the work of Isaac Asimov with a study of his Robot Series and an introduction to robot fiction in general, which he shaped in ways that remain important to this day. Book recommendation: I, Robot … Continue reading

Posted in A Reader's History of Science Fiction, Science Fiction | 1 Comment

#12 – Isaac Asimov Part I

Isaac Asimov was own of the most prolific authors of the golden age of sci-fi, especially when it comes to short stories. In this episode, we explore an overview of his work. Book recommendation: The End of Eternity. “The Last … Continue reading

Posted in A Reader's History of Science Fiction, Science Fiction | Comments Off on #12 – Isaac Asimov Part I

Could a Planet-Sized City Work?

In Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series, the planet Trantor is a single, huge city spanning its entire surface (also known as an ecumenopolis), an idea that was famously replicated with Coruscant in Star Wars. As a companion to tomorrow’s podcast on … Continue reading

Posted in Science, Science Fiction | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

#11 – John W. Campbell and the Golden Age of Sci-Fi

John W. Campbell was the controversial longtime editor of Astounding Science Fiction who single-handedly directed the course of science fiction in the 1940s, a time that is not called the “golden age of sci-fi.” However, I argue the golden age … Continue reading

Posted in A Reader's History of Science Fiction, Science Fiction | Comments Off on #11 – John W. Campbell and the Golden Age of Sci-Fi

Essay: The Real Problem with “The Cold Equations”

As part of tomorrow’s episode of A Reader’s History of Science Fiction, I felt the need to write a companion essay analyzing one of the most famous (or perhaps infamous) short stories in the history of the genre: “The Cold … Continue reading

Posted in Physics, Science Fiction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Essay: The Real Problem with “The Cold Equations”