#14 – Robert Heinlein Part I: The Juveniles

#46 – Science Fiction Today A Reader's History of Science Fiction

In the final episode of Season 1, we explore the state of the science fiction genre in the present day. Book recommendation: The Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin Worlds Without End's list of sci-fi classics Worlds Without End's customizable list N. K. Jemisin on the Broken Earth trilogy Edit: corrected links. Other books discussed: The Lady Astronaut series by Mary Robinette Kowal The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells
  1. #46 – Science Fiction Today
  2. Bonus Episode: More Alternate History
  3. #45 – Young Adult Dystopias
  4. #44 – The Children's Sci-Fi Renaissance
  5. #43 – Solar System Exploration

Robert Heinlein was one of the first major authors to write science fiction specifically for children. In this episode, we explore how he did it and what sets him apart from his contemporaries in this area, along with the other classic children’s sci-fi books up through the golden age.

Book recommendation: Have Spacesuit–Will Travel

Other books mentioned:
The Tom Swift Series
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
The Chrysalids by John Wyndham

Grumbles from the Grave, Chapter 3
John J. Miller on Starship Troopers
Adam Gopnik on The Little Prince
Farah Mendlesohn on children’s sci-fi
Alec Nevala-Lee on Heinlein’s writing

Check out this episode!

About Alex R. Howe

I'm a full-time astrophysicist and a part-time science fiction writer.
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1 Response to #14 – Robert Heinlein Part I: The Juveniles

  1. Tom Bridgman says:

    Nice episode that brought back some old memories.
    I hate to admit I never read any of the Heinlein juveniles, but I did read some of Asimov’s “Lucky Starr” series.
    Another children’s series from the 1950s-60s was the Mushroom planet series by Eleanor Cameron (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_Cameron).
    Another not quite sci-fi is “Hold Zero!” by Jean Craighead George about some kids involved in model rocketry (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12575200-hold-zero).

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