#11 – John W. Campbell and the Golden Age of Sci-Fi

#17 – Arthur C. Clarke A Reader's History of Science Fiction

Arthur C. Clarke was the fourth of the "Big Four" authors of the golden age of science fiction. In this episode, we explore his work and his unique writing style, especially centered around "sufficiently advanced technology." Book recommendation: The City and the Stars. Other books mentioned: Childhood's End A Fall of Moondust 2001: A Space Odyssey The Colours of Infinity on YouTube. Clarke's three laws.
  1. #17 – Arthur C. Clarke
  2. #16 – Ray Bradbury
  3. #15 – Robert Heinlein Part II: Politics, Religion, and Sex
  4. #14 – Robert Heinlein Part I: The Juveniles
  5. #13 – Isaac Asimov Part II: Robots

John W. Campbell was the controversial longtime editor of Astounding Science Fiction who single-handedly directed the course of science fiction in the 1940s, a time that is not called the “golden age of sci-fi.” However, I argue the golden age continued through the 1950s as writers who got their start under Campbell began publishing on their own.

Book recommendation: Mission of Gravity by Hal Clement.

Robert Silverberg on the golden age.
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database’s “Most-Viewed Short Fiction.”
Cory Doctorow on Campbell.
My essay on “The Cold Equations.”

Other books mentioned:
The Black Cloud by Fred Hoyle

Check out this episode!

About Alex R. Howe

I'm a full-time astrophysicist and a part-time science fiction writer.
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